history

Cape Ann and the internet

 ... shooters crop selection from 400 submissions 

from the Stringers' Photo Group


The view from Eastern Point Light, by Louise Fennell.

The Cape Ann photo project wasn't planned, it wasn't coordinated -- it just happened that way. Our photo group -- all vital, active outgoing seniors -- thought our Mirror readers would enjoy the beauty of this traditional artists' colony, and, as it happened, we spent two days wandering through Gloucester, Rockport, Eastern Point and Lanesville. This ancient spit of rocky land is 35 miles east-northeast of Melrose, along the Massachusetts coast.

And it is one of the most beautiful places in America -- in the world!

What you see on these pages are some 28 of the 400 frames the SilverStringers captured. And while we were shooting these scenes, we never realized the work that would be involved in reducing all those images to a manageable presentation. This article now becomes the largest, in terms of photographs, we have ever published in our seven years on line. It is, for us, another step in developing this new style of communication -- harnessing the internet to enjoyable, useful purpose.

All 28 thumbnail renditions are linked to full-screen photographs. This is a colorful, dynamic presentation, and we invite you to see each enlargement -- but it may take a return visit to see all of them.



A: The team includes, from the left, Don and Lorry Norris, Louise Fennell (group leader), Shirley Rabb, and Natalie Thomson. Another member, Elizabeth Sunkees, was in California during this period. The photo was taken by a bystander.

B: This little alleyway leads to a classic view of Rockport, Motif Number 1, and the harbor. SR.
C: Lanesville lady, who was happy to greet our small tribe of camera-bearing tourists. NT.

D: Arts and artifacts, antique and unique, open for inspection. Lanesville on Cape Ann. SR.



A: The powerful rocks, the gentle flow of the Annisquam River, and the protection of Annisquam Lighthouse make this a sighing scene. SR.

B: The village of Annisquam epitomises the coast of Massachusetts: rocky, irregular with hundreds of little coves, idyllic in its history. DN

C: A maze: Shirley captures Don shooting Louise as she captures the beauty of Cape Ann. Another version of Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First?" SR.

D: I bet I've photgraphed this place six times, in six different lights, and I always find something new. LF.



A: Sailing in a stiff breeze under a perfect blue sky. What more could one ask? Annisquam river. SR.

B: We're here and this is Rockport Harbor. NT.

C: (Louise has a special way of seeing still-life.) LF.

D: Angles and corners and geometric patterns provide a visual spectacle. The scene was lifted from a larger photo of an Annisquam home -- a happy surprise. SR.



A: Irony: Each link of this massive ancient iron chain must weigh a pound, yet its purpose today is to secure a flock of dinghies at Granite pier.  SR.

B: Bottles of French wine? German implements of war? No, simply blue buoys. LF.

C: Gloucester maintains its connection with the sea, although recently-imposed restrictions threaten the fishing industry. Gloucester Harbor.  DN.

D: The group made at least two dozen photos of this scene. NT.



A: Kayaks for rent -- a dramatic slice of the original photo that was four times this size. Bearskin Neck, Rockport. SR.

B: Purple and beige, blues and greens -- a marooned marsh near East Point Light. DN.

C: Annisquam rocks, mis-shapen by storms, wind, rain and the rapid tides of the Annisquam River. DN.



A: Oblivious to the passing crowd, a couple share a kiss on Bearskin Neck. SR.

B: Rockport is a community of handsome, practical homes that reflect the town's heritage with the sea. DN.

C: A streak of late-afternoon sun backlighted this stand of purple wild flowers, making the picture. LF.

D: White, wild and wistful, swaying in a gentle breeze, these delicate flowers were growing on a small drumlin west of the Annisquam. SR.

 

A: Cape Ann is like this; casual, a family-oriented place, with lots to do for all ages. Like these three folks, sitting on a stoop in Lanesville. DN.

B: Braided limbs and a streak of yellow sunlight at the Cox Reservation in Essex. NT.

C: A single oasis stands alone on the saltmarsh. NT.

D: Time out while overlooking Rockport Harbor, the team regroups after three hours of climbing, jumping, and rappelling Cape Ann's boney shores. SR.


July 3, 2003


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