Features

How does your garden grow?

... what your garden says about you

by Debbi Collar




Does your garden have a story to tell?

Dig deep enough into discussions with friends who have green thumbs to discover the
reasons behind their horticultural efforts and you will find many memorial gardens to
honor loved ones who have passed away, vegetable gardens, or sensory gardens "A
sensory garden is a garden environment that is designed with the purpose of stimulating
the senses. This stimulation occurs courtesy of plants and the use of materials that
engage one's senses of sight, smell, touch, taste, and sound." - wikipedia


Sensory gardens have recently peaked the interest of many educational systems where
students participate in community service programs helping others learn of plants
that are associated with touching each of the five senses. It is environment that
is designed with the purpose of stimulating the senses. This stimulation occurs
courtesy of plants and the use of materials that engage one's senses of sight, smell,
touch, taste, and sound.  

Observing gardeners as they plan, design and create, it becomes apparent how much
hard work is involved.  The usual timing is to get the seeds sown or plants put in
pots at the end of May (Memorial Day) Listed below are some gardens that do tell a
story.

Looking back at a history of gardens planted at such places as Sturbridge Village,
Plymouth Plantation and The Saugus Iron Works, gardens served more than one purpose.
A walk through the pathway on the historic grounds allows visitors the ability to  see
the uses  of each plant as they stroll through the labeled area of their garden.
Each label pointing various uses of the plants or herbs during that time period.
These plants or flower, depending on the label, may have been used for medicinal
purposes, for dyes or as cooking spices.


Labels inform of the uses of each plant and what it was used for in the past. Garden is
located at Saugus Iron works.


Some gardeners like to re-create horticultural delights photographed during their
travels, while some lie to enjoy the beauty of a patio garden but do not necessarily
enjoy the work involved. Still others like to  take the time to quietly sit, or to
pray or to take in the scenery a meditation garden.


Melrose Patio garden and Meditation garden at St. John's Episcopal Church,
Saugus


Others remember loved ones who have passed away by planting a memorial garden


This garden was planted in remembrance of a grandson killed in a car accident.

Today, sensory gardens are the rage. Educators especially use these if granted
permission to plant.

Gardening is also an activity in which both children and adults can work together to
create and learn. Saugus has just added an interesting idea to teach children about
gardening.  The Saugus Garden Club in collaboration with the Public Library has as one
of ts creations, invited children to participate int he process of plating.  There is a
special garden outside the  library. It is the creation of a pizza garden. The children
learn of what to plant to plant and eventually use for this pizza garden.  These herbs
and more are watched carefully by the students each Tuesday and eventually will go from
ground to table. One Saugus Garden Club member, prepares information for this hands on,
tasty teaching, garden class. Recently, 24 children participated in planting a variety
of gardens. The culmination of this project when all the flowers and herbs are ready
for harvesting will be to  have a pizza from their own "pizza garden."  

Other "healthy" plants seen at the library were broccoli, kale, squash, spinach and
more.


Pizza garden outside the Saugus Public Library and other gardens for children to
plant and enjoy


Whatever your  story - tell it through a garden.


My garden

Well, pictured above is my garden. We all have to start somewhere! This could be a
beginning of many stories to come as this gardening experiment continues.


***photo by Debbi Collar***


July 7, 2017


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